Motography

More than passing through

More than passing through

For the longest time, I’ve been trying to combine my two passions: motorcycle riding and photography. And failed at it, miserably.
I either rode or took photos. It’s two different mindsets.

That is changing now. I’m beginning to find a way to join the requirements of the road with those of the camera. Like so much else, it starts with a simple thought: You must be willing to dismount. If you’re bent on riding, you won’t even see as much subjects to photograph. So, tell yourself it’s okay to dismount. You’re not in a race. For the same reason, you need to take roads other than the highway, which I do anyway for the enjoyment they offer to the motorcyclist.

When you’ve seen a subject and have dismounted, everything about taking the photograph has to be convenient or you won’t stay motivated to take photos while riding. Camera and lenses have to be close at hand, accessible. On the other hand, on the bike, the expensive camera gear has to be protected against the elements and, most importantly, against the pervasive vibrations. So, put them on your body! At least on an adventure bike where you can stand on the footrests, you automatically protect your body against these factors.

Here comes Goldilocks and the three motorcycle camera carrying solutions:

Too much

Too much

Too little

Too little

Just right

Just right

All bags, backpacks, belts, harnesses and straps are by Think Tank. One more look at the combination I now prefer (the other two work, too):

The belt pack contains the Leica and two lenses, the "Perception Pro" backpack has room for two more Leica lenses, a (D)SLR with 50 mm lens mounted, a longer lens for that, film, if you're so bent, batteries, cleaning gear, cables and chargers, a notebook (paper), a notebook (electronic), a sketchpad and an iPad. And the kitchen sink.

The belt pack contains the Leica and two lenses, the “Perception Pro” backpack has room for two more Leica lenses, a (D)SLR with 50 mm lens mounted, a longer lens for that, film, if you’re so bent, batteries, cleaning gear, cables and chargers, a notebook (paper), a notebook (electronic), a sketchpad and an iPad. And the kitchen sink.

Don’t be like me and overload.

Another factor of convenience is being able to take the photograph without taking your helmet off. I try to avoid using Live View and some of my (film) cameras don’t even have a rear screen, so this necessitates a modular, flip-up helmet.

Got this Shoei Neotec 2 for this purpose

Got this Shoei Neotec 2 for this purpose

It is one of the few modular helmets where the visor will not fog even in these still wintery riding conditions.

So, having got this gear and having told myself to stop and take some photographs, what have I produced? See the slideshow below with some recent shots taken off the bike!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

So, there you are. Would that work for you? Are you a motographer?

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