The Flow on the Street

Ok, it's not a street photograph, but a photograph of a street reflected in a Beemer.

Ok, it's not a street photograph, but a photograph of a street reflected in a Beemer.


I’ve been taking street photographs the last few days with odd equipment, but it worked.
I used the Canon F1 New and Canon FD f/1.2 85 mm L lens. Color negative film, too, either Kodak Ektar or Fujifilm Superia 1600. So far, so good (and not so uncommon).
Mind you, the F1 New with this lens is not an inconspicuous, small camera. I even added to it’s attention catching potential by attaching a Canon AE Power Winder FN. While it adds shutter priority AE and takes over power supply of the camera, it has a distinct whine to it that can be heard from meters away.
Why did I do that then? Well, for the flow.
Even advancing the film manually interrupts it. Curiously, this isn’t the case on my Leica. There, it’s become second nature to advance the film right after a take. But with the heavily built Canon F1 New, actuating the film advance lever is always a separate measure.
And what about the noise? I certainly was heard by some of my subjects. I’m not into clandestine spy photography, though. Firstly, you’ll have to look like you know what you’re doing. Don’t hide your camera, be seen using it. Don’t fiddle with it, wield it like a Shōgō would his Kendō sword. No Kiai, though!
Once I’m revealed as the Paparazzo, a nod of the head or a quick smile make matters right again. This easy, non-verbal consent is contingent upon local and societal conditions, I’m sure. Out of my usual “hunting grounds” I’d be a lot more cautious, or quicker. 😉
So, without further techno-psychological skulduggery, here are some photos from yesterday:
A strong man moving things.

A strong man moving things.


A photographer praying.

A photographer praying.


A man driving his poodle.

A man driving his poodle.


A popular german TV cartoon character that has warts ...

A popular german TV cartoon character that has warts ...


... and a twenty-mile stare.

... and a twenty-mile stare.


And finally, two girls smiling.

And finally, two girls smiling.



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